CFCA Connect

A dynamic, interactive source of the latest information in the child, family and community welfare sectors. Here you can engage in discussions with your peers, comment on our content, find and contribute short articles on current issues, read summaries of important research and reports, and discover what's new in the field.

Current issues

  • Fathers’ involvement in the lives of their children: Separated parents’ preferences

    Changes occurring in family life over the last few decades, such as the progressive increase in the number of mothers in the workforce, have changed the way Australian families function.

    The ‘male-breadwinner, female-homemaker’ model has shifted to a shared (paternal and maternal) breadwinning role, and evidence now shows that fathers in Australia are spending more time caring for their children today than they were in the early 1990s…

  • Making Kids Central

    Written by Dr Tim Moore1 and Debbie Noble-Carr2

    In 2007, the Institute of Child Protection Studies at the Australian Catholic University conducted a study that looked at the experiences of children and young people who accompanied their parents during periods of homelessness. We found that:

    • It is vital to connect with children and young people in their own right, engage with them as individuals, and listen to and acknowledge their stories. Children and young people may also need support to be able to talk with parents about what is happening for them, and to maintain and strengthen relationships during periods of stress…
  • Reporting abuse and neglect: State and territory departments responsible for protecting children

    This resource provides information about how to report suspected child abuse or neglect.

    In Australia, state and territory governments are responsible for receiving reports of suspected child abuse and neglect from members of the public. Anyone who suspects, on reasonable grounds, that a child or young person is at risk of being abused and/or neglected should report it to the authority in their state or territory.

    Certain groups of people are required by law to report any suspicion of abuse or neglect of a child…

  • Safe and Supportive Family Environments

    Written by Dr Daryl Higgins1

    Today, the Department of Social Services published a report I wrote with Dr Killian Mullan about safe and supportive family environments for children.

    While most children live in safe and supportive environments, governments are aware that too many children are becoming known to child protection services. This has led to a shift in thinking away from solely concentrating on statutory responses to ‘risk of harm’ reports towards a broader public health approach to protecting Australia’s children, reducing the likelihood of children coming to the attention of statutory authorities…

  • International approaches to child protection: What can Australia learn?

    The provision of child protection services varies considerably across the world. This paper offers a broad overview of some of the main approaches to child protection used internationally.

    Using examples from Canada, Sweden, Belgium and the Gaza Strip, it offers policy-makers the chance to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, as well as how these examples might be used to inspire improvements within the Australian context…

  • Join the Conversation – Family violence, separated parents and fathering: Empirical insights and intervention challenges

    This CFCA information exchange webinar highlighted findings and discussed the implications of recent research projects into family violence and fathering.

    The webinar was presented by:

    • Dr Rae Kaspiew; and
    • Professor Cathy Humphreys.

    This forum can be used to post questions or comments, and to engage in discussion of the issues raised during the webinar. Rae and Cathy have generously volunteered to respond to questions submitted to this forum…

  • Does your child bully others? Ten positive actions for parents

    This paper is part of a compendium of resources focusing on children who bully at school which focuses on effective ways of working with families to interrupt the continuity from school bullying to later adverse life outcomes.

    So your child is bullying others?

    While it is a normal reaction to feel shocked, worried, fearful or even to deny or defend the bullying – try to listen to what others are saying about your child.

    Children can’t learn without making mistakes…

  • Helping your child stop bullying: A guide for parents

    This paper is part of a compendium of resources focusing on children who bully at school which focuses on effective ways of working with families to interrupt the continuity from school bullying to later adverse life outcomes.

    It’s hard for any parent to believe that their child is bullying another child, but sometimes it happens. You might be feeling shocked, worried, fearful or defensive – these are all normal reactions.

    Bullying can be stopped – and parents can make a big difference…

  • Working with families whose child is bullying: An evidence-based guide for practitioners

    This paper is part of a compendium of resources focusing on children who bully at school which focuses on effective ways of working with families to interrupt the continuity from school bullying to later adverse life outcomes.

    When children bully others at school, they are at significant risk of continuing this pattern of antisocial behaviour and having mental health concerns as they grow older. While bullying is often labelled as a school-related issue, it is also a family issue, as bullying is a behaviour often affected by the family environment. As such, working with families…

  • Children who bully at school

    This paper is part of a compendium of resources focusing on children who bully at school which focuses on effective ways of working with families to interrupt the continuity from school bullying to later adverse life outcomes.

    School bullying is a serious problem worldwide. There is now strong evidence to indicate that children who bully at school are at significant risk for a range of antisocial, criminal and poor health outcomes later in life. Importantly, bullying is a behaviour often influenced by family environment…

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